McDonald's Corporation

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McDonald's is an American fast food company franchise. It is the world's largest restaurant chain by revenue, operating through ~36,900 outlets in 100+ countries(2016).
The corporation's revenues come from the rents, royalties, and fees paid by their franchisees, as well as sales in company-operated restaurants:

  • 52.4%: Franchised and affiliated restaurants;
  • 47.6%: Company-owned restaurants.

In response to negative backlashes because of the unhealthiness of their food,ref the group has added salads, fish, smoothies, and fruit to its menu.

Linkback: Plastic Pollution

Company

Shareholders

Total float: 44.9%
Source: MarketScreener.svg, Mar.2020

"Foods"

Chicken McNuggets: see Super Size Me, @59:51 for the list of ingredients, Trailer. Also see Super Size Me 2, Trailer.

Timeline

ToDo: Investors, pics

Articles

  • Oct.04.2018: Young people are rewiring capitalism with their McStrike. A precarious and exploited workforce has had enough: young employees are joining unions and demanding to be heard. Retail and hospitality workers at JD Wetherspoon, McDonald's, Uber Eats and TGI Fridays marched out together in a coordinated strike. It is a battle that may determine the future of an increasingly precarious and exploited workforce. Britain’s unions were broken and battered by Thatcherism and never recovered. It is the younger workers who are least likely to be unionised: a mere 8% of under-25s are members. The lack of any organised counterweight to the power of bosses has left many lacking security, ill treated at work, and paid derisory wages. Britain’s workers have suffered the worst squeeze in wages of any industrialised nation other than Greece: for workers aged 18-21, real weekly wages collapsed by 16% in the years after the crash. The Guardian, Owen Jones.
  • May.24.2018: McDonald's sees off plastic straw campaign. McDonald's shareholders have rejected a proposal asking the firm to report on its use of plastic straws, the latest part of a campaign pressing the firm to ban the items. The idea, backed by activist group SumOfUs, won less than 8% of the vote at the company's annual meeting. The proposal asked the firm to submit a report on efforts to find alternatives to plastic straws and to assess the business risks associated with continuing to use them. McDonald's told shareholders that it already has a goal that by 2025, "all of McDonald's guest packaging (including straws) will come from renewable, recycled or certified sources. The requested report is unnecessary, redundant to our current practices and initiatives, and has the potential for a diversion of resources with no corresponding benefit to the company, our customers, and our shareholders". The firm has said it will start phasing out plastic straws in the UK. BBC News.
  • May.22.2018: Shocking images show McDonald’s balloons washed up on European coastlines at a rate of nearly one a day. These shocking images show McDonald’s BALLOONS washed up on coastlines around the world. Campaign group Blue Planet Society compiled the images to lobby the fast food chain to scrap balloons in addition to ditching single use plastic, such as straws. But founder John Hourston says it has been met with resistance – and claims the balloons are more damaging than any other form of plastic waste. Balloons from UK branches of McDonald’s have washed up across the North Sea, as far away as the coastlines of Belgium and Germany. Hourston has written to Steve EasterbrookWikipedia-W.svg, the British CEO of McDonald’s. "The Happy Meal balloon promotion is the gateway for McDonald’s to hooking kids into fast-food and for some reason they seem abnormally attached to the idea." A spokesman for McDonald’s said: “Helium balloons are no longer in use in the majority of our coastal restaurants. We have taken a number of steps to encourage customers to dispose of litter responsibly, and are currently in the process of replacing all helium balloons with stick balloons in coastal restaurants." The London Economic, Joe Mellor.