LobbyFacts

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LobbyFacts is a joint project of Corporate Europe Observatory and LobbyControl. Corporate Europe Observatory and LobbyControl are active members of the Alliance for Lobbying Transparency and Ethics Regulations (ALTER-EU) and the Full lobby transparency now! campaign.

Who are the biggest spenders on lobbying? Is there a balance between corporate and public interest lobbying? Are lobbyists spending more or less than last year? Which organisations have the most meetings with the Commission elite? Which organisations have the most EU parliament lobbyist passes? LobbyFacts can help you answer these kinds of questions.

Aggregates European Union lobbying data to make it more accessible. Has a dedicated “think tanks and research institutions” search category.

See their brochure for some good FAQ-type info.

Articles

  • Aug.21.2020: German EU Council Presidency: WIn doubt for industry? The EU Council of Ministers remains a gateway for lobbyists from large companies. Tax avoidance concerns us all, but Germany is refusing to put country-specific tax reporting for companies with a turnover of €750m or more on the upcoming agenda of the Competitiveness Council in Sept. The EU Council is the body through which member states decide on EU laws, together with the European Commission and the European Parliament. There is no transparency; govts see it as their right to negotiate EU proposals with one another outside the public eye. In "The German Presidency: Industry in the Leading Role", specific examples show how the Federal Govt has delayed or watered down laws in the interests of German corporations in the past few years. The Tax Justice Network shows how companies and their associations - above all the Family Businesses Foundation - succeeded in preventing the Federal Govt from approving tax transparency in the Council. Not putting the issue on the agenda at all is a real abuse of the role of the Council Presidency by the Federal Govt. The German EU Council Presidency must not put the interests of corporations above those of the general public. There has to be an end to privileged access by large corporations and one-sided clique rounds from powerful lobby groups. We need open, transparent and balanced debates. As part of its Council Presidency, Germany must also advocate a reform of the EU legislative procedure, particularly with a view to more transparency in Council work. But there is also a need for more clarity in Germany: a mandatory lobby register for the Bundestag and the Federal Govt, a legislative footprint and the publication of lobby meetings of ministers and senior officials. Nina Katzemich, LobbyControl.