Elections

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An election is the process of voting to choose someone to be their political representative in government. In a democracy, the right to vote is the main way most citizens can influence the decisions about how their country is governed. Citizens get their chance when the government decides to hold an election. To win an election, politicians have to persuade people to support them. Each political party needs to identify their policies (plan of action), explaining what they would do if they were elected. Each political party prepares a list of policies that the party promises to carry out if they are elected. This is called a manifesto. Citizens make their choice in secret by marking a ballot paper and putting this into a ballot box that is not opened until after the polls (casting of votes) have closed. Voters have to decide whether they agree with the manifesto promises and whether the politicians can be trusted to keep them if they get into power.[1]

Elections are a democratic process where citizens aged 18 and over elect candidates to represent them and their interests locally, nationally or internationally. The process is determined by a voting system, where citizens vote for one candidate. The candidate with the majority of votes is elected. Anyone who is enrolled on the Electoral Register is able to vote. There are four different types of election:[2]

An election is a democratic process where citizens vote to choose someone to represent them in govt. Anyone who is enrolled on the Electoral Register is able to vote. Voting is the way most citizens can influence decisions about how their country is governed. To win an election, politicians have to persuade people to support them. Each political party needs to state their policies (plans of action), explaining what they would do if they were elected. A list of policies is called a manifesto. Voters have to decide whether they agree with the manifesto promises and whether the politicians can be trusted to keep their promises if they get into power.

Elections are divided into three types (ToDo: sort this out, doesn't take devolved govts into a/c):

General Elections

The United Kingdom is divided into 650 areas known as parliamentary constituencies. Each constituency is represented by one Member of Parliament (MP) in the House of Commons. There are:[3]

See main article: General Elections

Local Elections

See main article: Local Elections

European Parliamentary Elections

Devolved Govts

Election Campaigning

Electoral Register

  • Aug.02.2011: NHS Pulls the Plug on its £11bn IT System (IT Disasters). Electoral register database. Plans to create a database of electors have been abandoned by the govt. The Co-ordinated Online Record of Electors (Core) was legislated for in 2006 and intended to make it easier for political parties to verify the legitimacy of their donors. Dept: Ministry of Justice. Cost: The database, which would have been administered by a new independent public body, would have cost an estimated £11.4m. Oliver Wright, The Independent.

References

  1. ^ What is an election? DK Find Out for Kids. Accessed Mar.29.2018.
  2. ^ What are elections? West Lancs Council. Accessed Mar.29.2018.
  3. ^ Parliamentary constituencies Parliament.uk. Accessed Mar.29.2018.
  • Mar.26.2018: We need to destroy the election-rigging industry before it destroys us. The private secret state will fight to keep Labour out of office and destabilise it if it wins. The unknowables are more troubling. If there is a firm embedded at the heart of the British establishment, drawing on hackers and what in le Carré novels are called “scalp hunters” to systematically flout the law, can anyone doubt that it would have used its full suite of techniques to help influence in the Brexit campaign? Let's state the bleedin' obvious. Soon Britain will hold a general election in which Jeremy Corbyn could become prime minister. Anybody who thinks SCL/CA would have no skin in that game is naive. The private secret state will be the sworn enemy of a radical Labour government; both for reasons of self-interest and ideology. There are plenty of prospective foreign clients who would pay good money to keep Corbyn’s Labour Party out of office and to destabilise it if it won. We need to destroy the election-rigging industry before it destroys us. Tag:SCL Group Paul Mason, The New Statesman.